When applying for gamedev jobs with a personal projects

When applying for gamedev jobs with a personal projects portfolio (before being asked for anything specifically, just at initial application level), do employers want to see finished product or do they want source code? I’m guessing it also depends on job type (like say for a level designer vs a combat designer) If you need source code, how much or how little of it should you put on github? Whole project? Relevant code sections?

This might be surprising, but recruiters and hiring managers often don’t actually bother to look at (or even ask for) submitted materials unless you’re an artist and have a portfolio. Most programmer candidacy proceedings I’ve been through haven’t asked for code samples, but prefer to send programming tests instead. I never expect any of the people I interview with to have played or even looked at my games before, even though several of them were very well known. I certainly can’t show them samples of the code I wrote for my employers – most professional programmers’ work is under NDA anyway, so asking for code samples isn’t a super common thing. I know that I’ve personally rejected zero candidates because of their how their personal projects were presented online. I’ve only ever looked at them after phone interviews and programming or design tests to get a better idea of a serious candidate.

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What hiring managers especially look for in a submission, however, is a resume that shows experience doing the duties and tasks that match the job opening. If that’s for a gameplay programmer role, we want to see things like building game systems, 3D math, and experience working with designers. If that’s for a level designer, we want to see things like building levels for Skyrim, Quake, Counter-Strike, etc. Make sure your skills are well-described in your resume. If it’s a decent match, that’s typically enough to get you past the initial screening process.

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Remember, when you’re doing an initial submission to a studio, you’re usually not presenting to a dev on the team. First, you have to get past the HR recruiter who sifts through all the candidates and only passes along the promising ones. Depending on the studio, these recruiters can go through dozens or even hundreds of CVs on a weekly basis. They don’t have the time to go look at everybody’s web page or github to do a deep dive, they put the resumes they get into two big piles – pass and fail. Those that pass move on to the hiring manager (and the candidate’s likely boss) for inspection, who will then pare down the list even further. In my experience, we give callbacks to maybe 10-20% of the total candidates who submit for a position. This means that a well-written, descriptive resume tailored for the job description will go a lot farther towards getting you a job than anything else.


The FANTa Project is currently on hiatus while I am crunching at work too busy.

[What is the FANTa project?] [Git the FANTa Project]

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Source: askagamedev
When applying for gamedev jobs with a personal projects portfolio (before being asked for anything specifically, just at initial application level), do employers want to see finished product or do they want source code? I’m guessing it also depends on job type (like say for a level designer vs a combat designer) If you need source code, how much or how little of it should you put on github? Whole project? Relevant code sections?

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